October is the month when we are reminded to take safety measures to avoid preventable fires that can destroy property and even worse, cause death.  Carbon Monoxide, known as the silent killer, is also included in this month’s education.

  • Three of every five home fire deaths result from fires in homes without smoke alarms or with no working smoke alarms, according to the National Fire Protection Association.
  • It is estimated that if every home had working smoke alarms, U.S. residential fire deaths could drop by 36 percent, saving approximately 1,100 lives per year, according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
  • Carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless and deadly gas that can be produced by any fuel-burning device, such as a furnace, boiler, stove and, of course, cars.
  • Known as “the silent killer,” CO poisoning is the number one cause of accidental deaths in the United States – responsible for an average of 450 deaths and more than 20,000 emergency room visits each year, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Carbon monoxide alarms are the only way to detect this poisonous gas, yet nearly half of Americans report not having carbon monoxide alarms in their homes.

 

 

FIRST ALERT

 

  • Having fire extinguishers – and knowing how to use them – is an important part of maintaining a safe home for you and your family. For general protection, it’s best to select a multi-rated extinguisher, such as the First Alert Rechargeable Home Fire Extinguisher (HOME1), that’s capable of handling most types of household fires.
    • HOME1 – MSRP: $44.99
    • Know How to Use It: Every First Alert fire extinguisher includes instructions on proper usage, but a simple way to remember is with the acronym PASS:
      • Pull the pin on the extinguisher
      • Aim the nozzle low toward the base of the fire
      • Squeeze the trigger
      • Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side
  • An escape plan is an important part of home safety – as well as practicing it twice a year. For loved ones not on the first floor, have an escape ladder, such as this Two-Story Fire Escape Ladder from First Alert (EL52-2), to ensure your family is prepared.
    • EL52-2 MSRP: $34.99
  • Smoke Alarms:
    • When installing new alarms, consider upgrading to the highest level of safety with 10-year battery alarms, such as the First Alert 10-Year Combination Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarm with Voice and Location Alerts (PRC710V).
      • PRC710V – MSRP: $59.99
    • For supplemental protection in your home, such as in the bedroom, the First Alert 10-Year Atom Smoke Alarm (P1010) packs all the power of an advanced photoelectric smoke alarm in a miniature design.
      • P1010 – MSRP: $39.99
    • For protection against both smoldering and fast-flaming fires, add a 10-Year Battery Dual Sensor Alarm (SA3210). This alarm contains both photoelectric and ionization sensors, which the National Fire Protection Association recommends installing in the home.
      • SA3210 – MSRP: $49.95
    • The Onelink Safe & Sound by First Alert is the first smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarm with a superior home speaker and built-in Amazon Alexa. The device will alert you on your cell phone in the event of a smoke or carbon monoxide emergency, no matter where you are, and with exclusive voice and location technology, the Onelink Safe & Sound alerts users to the type of danger and its location when in the home.
      • Onelink Safe & Sound – MSRP: $249.99
  • Carbon Monoxide Alarms:
    • The 10-Year Alarm Life Carbon Monoxide Alarm (CO710) is a nice table-top option, and offers a digital display with temperature that can be easily added to any room.
      • CO710 – MSRP: $59.95
    • Another easy-to-install choice that will protect your home from the deadly gas is the Carbon Monoxide Plug-In Alarm with Battery Backup (C0605) from First Alert. This alarm offers a battery backup in case of power outages and it plugs into any power outlet.
      • CO605 – MSRP: $29.99

 

SAFETY SHIELD:

Safety Shield flame & grease blocker has many benefits, it’s guaranteed to protect your home and family from a potential BBQ-ING disaster as well as expensive damage to your property. Go to www.bbqSafetyShield.com to purchase and for more information and videos.

  • *Only product on the market
  • *Guaranteed to protect your home from potential disaster
  • *Special coated silicone fabric
  • *Made in the USA  
  • *Used by our military
  • *FM approved *UL rated  
  • *easy to install
  • *Easy to clean
  • *Different sizes for different dwellings
  • *Great as a gift
  • *Peace of mind for rental dwellings  

Additional fire safety facts from First Alert:

Carbon Monoxide Information and Statistics

  • Carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless and deadly gas that can be produced by any fuel-burning device, such as a furnace, boiler, stove and, of course, cars.
  • Known as “the silent killer,” CO poisoning is the number one cause of accidental deaths in the United States – responsible for an average of 450 deaths and more than 20,000 emergency room visits each year, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Carbon monoxide alarms are the only way to detect this poisonous gas, yet nearly half of Americans report not having carbon monoxide alarms in their homes.

10-Year Alarms

  • With 10-year sealed battery alarms, homeowners no longer need to remember to replace batteries for the life of their alarms. Plus, 10-year alarms eliminate the risk of ever having an alarm deactivated due to battery removal.
    • With the added benefit of having 10-year sealed battery smoke alarms, you won’t need to worry about replacing the batteries, but it’s still important to test the alarm.
  • Several states, including California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland and Oregon, as well as the cities of Indianapolis, Louisville, Milwaukee, New York City, Philadelphia and Phoenix, recently have passed laws requiring 10-year battery smoke alarms in various types of residential buildings.

Smoke and CO Alarm Tips

  • The National Fire Protection Association recommends that smoke alarms be installed on every level of the home, including the basement, inside each bedroom and in the main corridors, and carbon monoxide alarms should be installed on each level of the home and in a central location outside each bedroom.
    • To put this in perspective, the average-sized home in America – a two-story, three-bedroom house – needs a minimum of five smoke alarms and four carbon monoxide alarms.
  • Once alarms are installed, be sure to properly maintain them:
    • Test the alarm regularly.
    • Replace batteries every six months.
    • Alarms don’t last forever, and it is necessary to replace smoke alarms every 10 years and carbon monoxide alarms every five to ten years.
      • Both smoke and CO alarms should be replaced based on the manufacture date – not the purchase or installation date.
    • If you can’t remember or don’t know how old the alarm is, it is best to replace the unit completely.

Additional Home Fire Safety Tips

  • It’s important to make an escape plan with your loved ones, and practice it at least twice a year – so in the event of a fire everyone knows how to get out safely.
    • Involve everyone in developing a plan. Walk through and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Identify two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Make sure everyone in the home understands the plan.
    • Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor’s house, mailbox or stop sign) a safe distance from your home where everyone can meet.
    • Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any family member can call from a neighbor’s home or cell phone once safely outside.
  • Keep fire extinguishers close at hand, and within easy reach of the cooking area.

Additional Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

  • Never use a generator indoors.
    • In the case of a power outage, portable electric generators should only be used outside at a safe distance from the home (at least 15 feet), as using a generator inside the home or in a garage could allow carbon monoxide to collect.
  • Any fuel-burning appliances should be inspected regularly.
    • Arrange for a professional inspection of all fuel-burning appliances annually to detect any carbon monoxide leaks.
  • Be mindful of the garage. Never leave a car running in an attached garage. Even if the garage door is open, carbon monoxide emissions can leak into the home.
  • If your carbon monoxide alarm does sound, leave the home immediately for fresh air and call 911.

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